NonOrdinary States of Consciousness and the Accessing of Feelings


by John E. Mack, M.D.

We are seeing lately an expanded interest in psychotherapies, human growth-promoting workshops, and spiritually focused methods of inner exploration, which have in common the use of nonordinary states of consciousness to access deeper and more intense experience and emotion. At first glance, these approaches may appear new, deviant, or even radical. In actuality, however, they represent means of rediscovering access to realms of the psyche that have been familiar to ancient peoples and non-Western societies from the beginning of recorded time. Shamanic healing, mysticism, kundalini yoga, naturally growing hallucinatory plants, meditation methods, and ecstatic religious experiences arc but a few of the ways that human beings throughout history have opened themselves to the deeper regions of the psyche.

The imbalanced rationalism of the Western mind has succeeded in separating us from this fuller knowledge of ourselves and the universe in which we are embedded. Freud’s work might be considered in this light as a beginning effort to reacquaint our culture with these lost domains of knowledge. But in his almost exclusive focus on individual biographical development and experience, Freud turned away from the staggering implications of what he was discovering, leaving it to others to map more fully the virtually infinite reaches of the human psyche.

FREUD AND THE HISTORICAL USE OF HYPNOSIS

Psychoanalysis traces its origins to the use by Freud (1925) of Western medicine’s most familiar nonordinary state of consciousness, hypnosis, to explore the unconscious origins of neurotic symptoms (p. 19). Freud extended the use of hypnosis from its limited application by Liebeault and Bernheim as a means of removing symptoms by suggestion to its fuller use as an investigative method. It is striking that these words are being written almost exactly a century after Freud gave up the therapeutic use of hypnosis in favor of the concentration method and then free association, which led to the development of psychoanalysis itself. Although he abandoned hypnosis for complex reasons, including that he did not consider himself adept in it, Freud continued throughout his life to acknowledge his debt to hypnosis for opening to him the vistas of the human unconscious. “We psycho-analysts may claim to be its legitimate heirs and we do not forget how much encouragement and theoretical clarification we owe to it” (Freud, 1917, p. 462), Freud wrote, 25 years after he had stopped using hypnosis with his patients.

A reconsideration of the principal reasons why Freud gave up hypnosis can help us to understand why therapists and patients are returning a century later to the use of nonordinary states of consciousness, including hypnosis, for treating a variety of emotional disorders and for the deeper exploration of unconscious psychological forces. In view of the way that hypnosis was used in Freud’s time (i.e., to suggest away symptoms through the use of the doctor’s authority while the patient was in an altered state of consciousness), it is not surprising that many patients “relapsed” and that the method appeared to be therapeutically ineffectual.

In Freud’s emerging view of the therapeutic process in psychoanalysis, the figure or role of the doctor was of central importance. Therapeutic change would come to be seen as the result of many forces, but of greatest importance was the analysis of transference — the meanings and distorted attributions from the patient’s past upon the person of the analyst. The hypnotic connection, as viewed by Freud, was a highly erotized relationship whose effectiveness depended on the physician’s authority and hardly allowed detailed examination of the patient’s feelings and thoughts directed toward the doctor, on which psychoanalytic treatment came increasingly to depend.

During the time that Freud was still using hypnosis therapeutically, his illustrations of how he would work indicate the peremptory and radically nonanalytic way he might speak to patients: “You are not asleep, but you are hypnotized, you are under my influence; what I will say to you now will make a special impression on you and will be of use to you” (Freud, 1891, p. 110). More than a decade after he stopped using it, and had developed the free association method, Freud (1905) still viewed hypnosis in this authoritarian light.

The hypnotist says: “You see a snake; you’re smelling a rose; you’re listening to the loveliest music,” and the hypnotic subject sees, smells and hears what is required of him by the idea that has been given…. outside hypnosis and in real life, credulity such as the subject has in relation to his hypnotist is shown only by a child towards his beloved parents… an attitude of similar subjection on the part of one person towards another has only one parallel, though a complete one — namely in certain love-relationships where there is extreme devotion [p. 296].

The idea that hypnosis necessarily required a virtually slavish attitude of the patient toward the hypnotist may have been a carryover of 19th-century beliefs from the days of Mesmer, Puysegar, Braid, Charcot, and others. It surely was inconsistent with the emphasis on the analysis of resistance that became central in Freud therapeutic method. “The objection to hypnosis,” Freud wrote in a 1904 essay on psychoanalytic procedure, “is that it conceals the resistance and for that reason has obstructed the physician’s insight into the play of psychical forces. Hypnosis does not do away with the resistance but only evades it and therefore yields only incomplete information and transitory therapeutic success” [p. 252].

Freud’s repudiation of hypnosis as a therapeutic technique is based on the idea that the very nature of the hypnotic process necessitates the bypassing of the patient’s observing self and the surrender of executive ego functioning to the hypnotist. The belief that the patient must be a more or less passive agent, surrendering his or her will to the authority of the hypnotist to whom he or she is emotionally bonded, Svengali-like, has, I believe, prejudiced the professional view of hypnosis and perhaps our attitude toward the therapeutic use of other nonordinary states of consciousness as well.

In spite of the negative associations, it was perhaps inevitable that interest in using nonordinary states of consciousness in general and hypnosis in particular for exploring the depths of the psyche and treating emotional disorders would be revived. For with the discoveries of psychoanalysis, together with evolving interest in this century in the richness and complexity of human emotional life, we have also learned the limitations of purely verbal methods for investigating unconscious mental content and processes. Hypnotic trance states facilitate (almost by definition) the suspending of attention to the stimuli of ordinary waking consciousness and enable the intricately layered affective and cognitive domains of the inner world to emerge.

Gill and Brenman (Brenman and Gill, 1947; Gill and Brenman, 1961), Hilgard (1965), Frankel (1976), Spiegel and Spiegel (1978), Brown and Fromm (1986), and Fass and Brown (1990) have established the extraordinary value of hypnosis as an investigative tool both for exploring human perception, trance, dissociative states, and ego functioning and for treating a variety of clinical conditions. Contemporary therapeutic applications of hypnosis are far more sophisticated than the methods applied in Freud’s time. Evolving from the techniques of Milton Erickson, Erika Fromm, and others, the approaches used now are largely “permissive” rather than authoritative, permitting the patient’s own creative energies and directions to guide the process, with the hypnotist functioning primarily as a facilitator who provides a safe, structured context in which the work can proceed (Fass and Brown, 1990, p. 46).

Accessing, tolerating, expressing and integrating emotionally powerful experience are of central importance in the therapeutic use of hypnosis, for the vicissitudes of human development have for countless individuals included a wide range of encounters, stimuli, excitements, disappointments, and wounds whose pathogenic energies persist until their source can be identified and the affectively charged memories recovered and reworked. Hypnosis is perhaps the classically structured nonordinary state of consciousness, for it comprises both verbal and nonverbal techniques to facilitate and organize the emergence of affectively laden memories and to control the regressive intensity of the investigative and therapeutic processes.

Fromm (1972), Spiegel (1981), and Haley (this volume, 1993) have shown how hypnosis can be used to enhance the patient’s sense of being in charge or in control of the mind and the therapeutic process itself while affectively disturbing memories emerge. This focus on the patient’s sense of agency and empowerment is consistent with shifting contemporary notions of transference and of the therapist-patient relationship. The therapeutic enterprise in general is being perceived increasingly in nonhierarchical terms, with the analyst or therapist functioning as a facilitator in a collaborative process or dialogue. Transference attributions naturally arise, but in contemporary mutual or collaborative approaches, the distortions of perception of the figure of the analyst, whose examination once constituted the backbone of the treatment endeavor, are less likely to be encouraged. The figure of the doctor or therapist himself, including the hypnotist, is becoming less central, as authority is increasing given over to the patient’s own self-exploration and self-functioning (Gray, 1990).

This shift in our view of the nature of the therapeutic enterprise (Mack, 1990, 1992) has great implications for the use of nonordinary states of consciousness in clinical work. In the Grof holotropic breathwork method, for example, which is discussed later, the role of the figure of the leader is that of a facilitator, the transference elements are minimized, and great trust is placed in the patient’s inner wisdom during the selfdiscovery process (Grof, 1988, 1992).

TRAUMA, AFFECT, AND NONORDINARY STATES OF CONSCIOUSNESS

Recognition and understanding of trauma have been central in the evolution of psychoanalytic and psychodynamic theory and practice. Early use of hypnosis by Charcot, Lebeault, Bernheim, and Freud led to the recognition that experiences that derived from some action or event in the outside world and that overwhelmed the ego’s defenses would produce a state of unbearable and unmanageable tension, which could not be discharged except through symptom formation, pathological character development, destructive (including self-destructive) actions, or ego fragmentation. At the core of all theories of trauma are a fundamental state of helplessness and vulnerability and an inability to define, experience, express, or integrate disturbing affects that are brought about by such hurtful or threatening events. Trauma is thus the outcome of a relationship between the intrapsychic and the external worlds.

In view of the intensity with which the ego strives to ward off the distress associated with traumatic memories, it is not surprising that use of a powerful therapeutic tool like hypnosis, which can overcome defensive barriers, would have led to the recovery of traumatic memories. As Freud gave up hypnosis and developed the psychoanalytic method, he also turned to the exploration of the intrapsychic world and, to a great extent, left behind the study of trauma, especially the pathological effects of incestuous sexual seduction on the young women he was treating.

Gradually and inescapably, mental health clinicians have returned to the study and treatment of emotional trauma if for no other reason than that the pervasive, hurtful effects of physical and sexual abuse, war and the threat of war, refugee problems, racial injustice, economic inequality and losses, family breakup and instability, and separations of all kinds have forced us to reshape our theoretical formulations and reorder our clinical priorities.

Several chapters in this book address the relationship between acute and persistent trauma and affective disturbances, and the renewed attention to trauma is enabling us both to discover the complex biological, psychological, and social forces involved in it and to discover new treatment approaches while returning to and rediscovering older methods that were left behind in the development of psychoanalysis.

It is in this context — the return of our attention to trauma — that the renewed interest in the therapeutic power of nonordinary states of consciousness can be best understood. For it is through the use of such states of consciousness that clinicians can most effectively address buried memories and the associated feelings that could not be recognized, felt, or expressed at the time when the trauma was occurring. For example, Haley (this volume) describes the use of hypnosis to access feelings and memories of deeply troubling actions on the part of Vietnam veterans that so overwhelmed the soldiers’ emotional defenses and so deeply violated basic personal values at the time they occurred that the very capacity to feel itself — that which, above all, makes us human — was severely damaged. Hypnosis is used here effectively to identify, uncover, and work through traumatic memories and associated powerfully disturbing affects that were inaccessible at the time that the traumatic event occurred (Brown and Fromm, 1986). In contrast to the early use of hypnosis primarily for undoing repression and for symptom removal through suggestion, contemporary applications to the treatment of trauma involve a systematic treatment process in which hypnosis is used in conjunction with other therapeutic methods such as self-hypnotic relaxation, guided imagery and hypnoprojective techniques, and various supportive and ego adaptive approaches (Brown and Fromm, 1986, p. 277). In these approaches, the therapeutic objectives include not only the uncovering and working through of troubling affects but also ego integration, selfdevelopment, and even “learned psychophysiological control” to enable the traumatized person to react less sensitively to future triggering of traumatic experiences (Brown and Fromm, 1986; van der Kolk, this volume).

GROF HOLOTROPIC BREATHWORK

Therapeutic application of a nonordinary state of consciousness is central to the holotropic breathwork method developed by Stanislav and Christina Grof (Grof, 1988, 1992), the former, a physician trained as a Freudian psychoanalyst in Prague in the 1950s. In 1956, he became one of the first physicians to experiment with LSD soon after it was discovered by Albert Hofmann at Sandoz Laboratories in Switzerland Hofmann, 1983). Grof’s personal experiences with this psychedelic agent radically changed his view of the human psyche, the therapeutic process, and his understanding of humankind’s place in the cosmos. He found that there were vast (“transpersonal”) realms of the unconscious beyond what he had found to be accessible through the free association method. Intense emotions and powerful images associated with early experiences, his own birth, and domains outside of biographical history were opened up to consciousness with the use of LSD (Grof, 1975).

During the next two decades, Grof conducted approximately 4,000 research and therapeutic sessions with LSD in Czechoslovakia and the United States. In the 1970s, he found that sessions using deep and rapid breathing with evocative music and taking place in a supportive and secure setting could access the same personal and transpersonal realms of experience as he was encountering with LSD. Over the past 15 years the Grofs have conducted thousands of holotropic breathwork sessions in small groups and workshops and have trained several hundred breathwork practitioners who are now applying their method in the United States and Europe.

My own first direct experience with holotropic breathwork occurred in 1987 with the Grofs in a small-group setting at the Esalen Institute in California. During the two-hour session, I experienced intense feelings of loss associated with the death of my biological mother when I was 8 1/2 months old, as well as a profound sense then and in subsequent sessions of both her suffering with peritonitis before she died and my father’s grief following her death — emotions about which I had spoken extensively during my two personal analyses but which I had never been able to access in such an immediate way. During that session, in which two Soviets were also participating, I had my own introduction to the transpersonal realms of the unconsciousness, namely, a powerful experience of identification with a person, other being, object in nature, or force that lay outside of my personal history. I “became” a Russian father (in what seemed to be the 15th century) who was unable to protect his four-year-old son from being beheaded by the Mongols. Out of this experience, my capacity to identify with Soviet fears, and seemingly unrealistic polit-ical defensiveness, increased greatly, enabling me to become more effec-tive in the psychopolitical work on the Soviet-American relationship in which I was then engaged. Subsequent sessions of my own involved equally powerful and valuable biographical, birth-related, and transpersonal experiences.

Drawing upon his experience with LSD and holotropic breathwork, Grof has developed a new topography, or “cartography,” of the human psyche: memories and feelings related to the perinatal, postnatal, and transpersonal levels of experience mingle in complex ways and can be accessed through nonordinary states of consciousness, including, in addition to breathwork and psychedelics, hypnosis, mystical experiences, profound meditative states, yoga, shamanic journeys, and religious ecstasies. Buried biographical memories and feelings return with special vividness and power. Birth-related experiences that can be traced to the stages of the birth process itself (Grof has identified four birth phases he calls matrices) are relived with great power (Grof, 1985). Experiences of birth, death, and rebirth open the breather’s consciousness to realms of experience beyond familiar conscious and unconscious material. Finally, the breather is able to discover affinities outside of hitherto known interpersonal relationships, experiencing profound encounters or identifications with mythic figures and potentially all of the human and nonhuman elements in the cosmos. The collective unconscious that is often largely a theoretical construct in Jung’s theories becomes a living reality in breathwork experiences.

The transpersonal dimension of the work has a powerful spiritual impact, reconnecting the breather with primary religious experiences, a sense of sacred awe from which he or she may have been cut off since childhood. Powerful heart-openings and uplifting, luminous, or transcendent experiences bring the breather to a higher sense of value and purpose and of connection with the universe. Nature itself becomes imbued (or reimbued) with deep and ineffable sacred beauty and wonder, and the destruction being wrought by technology and material desire become intolerable. Perhaps the most fundamental difference between the breathwork method and psychoanalysis — or the psychoanalytically derived psychotherapies — lies in the role of the therapist. In the psychodynamic therapies, at least as traditionally practiced, the clinician’s role is central, either as a transference figure or through providing in his or her own person or interpretation some sort of corrective experience or new relationship model. In the breathwork, intense feelings in relation to the figure of the leader or facilitator, or to other supporting figures, naturally arise, and such a figure may even be distorted, idealized or devalued. But the fundamental process is not based primarily on transference or even on the actual relationship with the clinician. Instead, a kind of inner radar searches the unconsciousness in a process of opening and discovery facilitated or enabled by the therapist/leader but not focused on him or her.

As practiced in individual work or groups, a safe and secure space is found that provides enough room for the breather(s) to move around freely in response to bodily impulses or strong feelings that come up in the session. Each breather is paired with a “sitter,” who attends to his or her basic needs and safety, such as providing water, tissues, and protection from bumping into or being bumped by other breathers or accompanying the breather to the bathroom. The leader is supported by other facilitators, one of whom attends to the music. A ratio of one facilitator to four to six pairs seems to be ideal. The sessions begin in a somewhat darkened room with the breathers lying on their back in a comfortable, open position, sometimes covered with a blanket or using eyeshades so as to block out light. The breathers are instructed to put aside expectations and not to try to solve any identified problem or focus on a particular conflict or “issue” but to trust that their inner wisdom will take their consciousness where it needs to go. A brief relaxation exercise starts the process of turning inward, and instruction is given to breathe more deeply and rapidly, after which the music begins — loud and driving at first, eventually more steady, and heartful or celestial, with variations according to the choices of the facilitator.

As the turning inward process deepens, and the busy-mind activity we ordinarily associate with everyday consciousness is left behind or allowed to pass by (as also occurs in meditation), powerful emotions, body sensations and impulses, and strong images come into consciousness, which may relate to biographical or perinatal experiences or to transpersonal realms that have little to do with the known history of the individual. It is difficult to generalize, but from an ontological standpoint, the quality of the experience at its height tends to lie somewhere between fantasizing and being fully present to a new reality. One may, for example, be fully engaged in a struggle with a god or other mythic being or become quite completely a fish swimming under water. At the same time, however, a small but steady, observing ego is recording what is being experienced and can usually report on it later.

From an affective standpoint, the intensity and range of feelings are greater than I have generally noted in therapies that do not use a nonordinary state of consciousness. This is especially true when repositories of warded off feeling have been identified and brought into full consciousness and expression by effective bodywork techniques (Grof with Ben-nett, 1992, p. 16). The sessions generally last from two to three hours and are concluded by completing a mandala drawing, which may express central elements of the experience, even when breathers consider themselves inept as an artist.

The breathwork leader functions as a facilitator, enabling the value of the experience to take place by overseeing the physical space, making sure that each breather’s basic safety is ensured, noting that the music is moving the energy in the room in a positive direction (a judgment that is largely intuitive), and performing focal bodywork as needed (Grof with Bennett, 1992, p. 16). Again, transference elements may arise: the facilitator may appear to a breather as a loving or threatening father or mother figure or be confused with a god, goddess, or other mythic being. But this dimension is secondary. The therapeutic, healing, or growth-promoting work is largely the result of the psyche’s own direction, the inner radar (Grof with Bennett, 1992) that identifies the places that our consciousness needs to go. In this way, theoretical constructs or preconceptions about “what I should work on today” are put aside in favor of an unconscious knowledge of the inner realms that need to be explored at the time. Remarkably, in later discussion or through sharing in small groups, the relevance of what has occurred in the session to the breather’s ongoing life becomes apparent, sometimes with startling clarity.

HOLOTROPIC BREATHWORK, TRAUMA, AND AFFECT

The holotropic breathwork method can evoke a wide range of profound emotions and bring the breather in touch with a rich world of images and sensations whether the individual is choosing the experience for therapeutic reasons or for purposes of personal growth. The breathwork underscores, however, the important pathogenic role of trauma in human development. Trauma, as Herman (this volume) discusses, may range from a single severe physical assault to complex, chronic, and catastrophic physical and psychological affliction. Grof distinguishes traumas of commission, such as parental cruelty, childhood surgery, rape, varieties of physical and sexual abuse, war and refugee experiences, or the birth process itself, from those of omission, which are associated with deprivation, loss, or unmet emotional needs. In both instances, the therapeutic power lies in the capacity of the breather to access in the altered state of consciousness past experiences that had originally occurred under conditions in which the experience often could not even be defined and feelings could not be identified, felt, or expressed.

The traumatic history may be quite well known to the breather. In my first breathwork session, another breather, a man in his mid-50s, was screaming in fear and rage as he relived an attempt by his mother to choke him as a baby. In this first breathwork session, he told me months later, he felt in the nonordinary state of consciousness associated with this experience more relief from the fear and anger than he had felt during many years of talking about the event through other forms of therapy. Through this method, many patients are enabled to discover childhood surgery or parental relational neglect. They can obtain relief from disabling symptoms or constricting affects — emotions that have been walled off or frozen since the time of the trauma.

The memories of many forms of trauma, such as infant and early childhood surgery and accidents or acute and chronic experiences of physical and sexual abuse, are stored in the body and locked away, it would appear, as much in the tissue cells themselves as in the brain. The process of accessing or reaccessing emotions in a nonordinary state of consciousness such as occurs in the holotropic breathwork method may be related to the emotions recovered through autonomic arousal as van der Kolk discusses in this volume. Memories that seem inaccessible through associative techniques may have been recorded initially as unexpressed or even unfelt physiologically anchored energies and may require a new context and means of accessing them in order to bring about relief of symptoms and integration of the crippling pathological impact of the original experiences. As traumatic memories and associated powerful feelings become accessed during nonordinary states, intense energies expressed through body tensions, shaking, sobbing, loud vocalization, and other emotional expressions may come to the surface. Sometimes tensions become “stuck” in the musculature, requiring focal bodywork performed by skilled facilitators, to move the energy along. The facilitors provide physical resistance to the experiencer’s effort, as he or she is encouraged, paradoxically, to exaggerate the tension or strain in the involved muscle groups. The expression of a full sound, such as a groan or scream, also helps to discharge the painfully stored emotion.

In the case of situations of personal deprivation and loss, the reliving of personal wounds in a setting of caring and protection may be powerfully therapeutic. A sensitive sitter can provide comforting and holding, especialIy at the conclusion of the session, when the breather is most open and needy. It is important that the sitter recognize the special vulnerability and openness brought about by the altered state of consciousness in the breathwork session and not intrude his or her own emotional need to heal or rescue the breather. Above all, the safety provided and the opportunity to reaccess and tolerate by means of the altered state of consciousness the original loss and associated painful affects constitute the core of the therapeutic or healing process.

Following the breathwork session, in which a great deal of affectively powerful material may have come forth, it is important that breathers be given the opportunity to integrate the experience of what they have undergone by sharing in small-group discussion and individual sessions with clinicians who are familiar with the therapeutic use of nonordinary states of consciousness and with the perinatal and transpersonal realms of the unconscious. This process may be similar to the “working through” that occurs in traditional psychoanalysis except that the primary therapeutic or healing work occurs in the nonordinary state of consciousness while the talking serves to consolidate and integrate the intense feelings and personal discoveries that have occurred during the breathwork sessions. More traditional psychotherapies or “talking treatments” are particularly important following breathwork sessions in order to explore the changes and future decisions to be made concerning human relationships and work choices. After one explores the psyche through holotropic breathwork or other kinds of nonordinary states of consciousness, profound changes in worldview, values, and personal priorities are likely to occur. This can leave one feeling quite alone and “unmet” unless one has a community of friends or colleagues who have also discovered holotropic realms in their own therapeutic work or spiritual paths.

COMMON ELEMENTS AND DIFFERENCES

There are, of course, a great variety of ways of bringing about nonordinary states of consciousness in addition to hypnosis and holotropic breathwork (aforementioned) and meditation (Brown, this volume). Most of these can be used therapeutically or for personal growth work and include shamanic journeys, psychedelic substances, religious ecstatic states, yoga, relaxation techniques, therapeutic touch, bodywork (alone or in combination with psychological methods), various energy therapies and massage, and some types of music, poetry reading, and other forms of artistic experience and expression. Psychoanalysis and free association create to a certain degree a nonordinary state of consciousness, especially when dreams and associated affects are worked with intensively. But the reliance on verbalization, the interactive or ongoing relational dimension, and the interpretive process tend to limit the extent to which the method facilitates the creation of an altered state or can provide access to the deeper realms of the unconscious.

Freud (1895) wrote of the “withdrawal of the cathexis of attention” from the outside world that occurs in hypnosis (p. 337). In his view, which he continued to express as late as 1921 and which was consistent with his emphasis on the centrality of transference, this shift in the “distributions of mental energies” occurs as a result of the patient’s directing attention onto the person of the analyst (Freud, 1921, p. 126). The perspective being offered here for hypnosis and other altered states, including meditation (“reducing the amount of sensory input,” Brown, this volume), also stresses the shift of attention away from the outside world but places less emphasis on the role of the leader or therapist, who functions more as a guide or facilitator to support the patient or client in redirecting attention to the inner world.

When the person’s energies are effectively withdrawn from the outside world, and attention and perception shift to inner feelings, thoughts, and sensations, a nonordinary state naturally occurs. Its depth depends on the person’s ability to simultaneously note and “let go of” distracting products of mental activity as they pass through awareness. This “mindfulness” or turning inward is the common characteristic of therapeutic modalities such as hypnosis and Grof breathwork and the meditation techniques and processes described by Brown (this volume). Therapeutic nonordinary states and meditation also have in common the eliciting of thoughts and feelings from the deeper levels of the psyche and the creation of a new awareness of the unconscious and the inner world. As Brown writes of the preliminary stage of meditation, “Amongst the flow of thoughts, memories, fantasies, percepts, bodily sensations and other events in the stream of consciousness the meditator also will observe the ebb and flow of emotional states.”

But the experiencing of affects, however therapeutic it may be or central to the use of nonordinary states of consciousness in a healing context, is not the purpose of advanced states of meditation. Here the focus is on awareness itself and the process of self-observation. The self itself as the instrument of knowing dissolves, and the pure experience of interconnectedness or oneness can emerge. Affects, even when fully experienced, are allowed to be held in consciousness, but only so that the perception of them, like all other perceptions, can be allowed to pass. The ultimate goal of meditation is not therapeutic, or even to bring about healing. Rather it is to bring enlightenment by gaining control of and changing the very structure of perception and information processing so that egoistic concerns can be relinquished and the experience of love, compassion, and oneness may emerge. Stated differently, nonordinary states, when used therapeutically, seek to bring the deeper realms of the psyche into consciousness in order to expand self-knowledge and to integrate memories and experiences from which we have been cut off or which afflict us through their actions outside of awareness. A skilled meditator, on the other hand, as Brown (this volume) writes, changes his view of reality itself, gaining access to expanded awareness by breaking “the code of the time-space structure of ordinary perception.”

SUMMARY

Through nonordinary states of consciousness we can be brought into connection with the cycles of birth, death, and rebirth; with powerful feelings from early childhood; and with the transpersonal realms in which each individual can discover the capacity to identify with beings and forces in nature outside of personal biographical experience — a physical and emotional reification of Jung’s idea of the collective unconscious.

When we are able to access, or reaccess, emotions that have been warded off in the body cells or in autonomic regulatory systems, then the human organism’s previously blocked natural healing powers can become available. It is in this working through or integrative process that the greatest therapeutic value of nonordinary states may reside.

Finally, nonordinary states of consciousness have value beyond their therapeutic applications for personal growth and the expansion of consciousness. As Brown discusses in Chapter 17, the turning of attention from outer stimuli to the inner processes of thought and feeling, as occurs among experienced meditators, permits the questioning of the structure of perception itself and makes available information from a realm of being in which the distinctions between inside and outside or between psyche and nature lose their power and in which a deeply fulfilling extension of the range of human consciousness can occur.

References

Brenman, M. & Gill, M. M. (1947), Hypnotherapy: A Survey of the Literature. Menninger Foundation Monographs Series 5. New York: IUP.

Brown, D. & Fromm, E. (1986), Hypnotherapy and Hypnoanalysis. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Fass, M. & Brown, D., ed. (1990), Creative Mastery in Hypnosis and Hypnoanalysis. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Frankel, F. H. (1976), Hypnosis: Trance as a Coping Mechanism. New York: Plenum Medical Books.

Freud, S. (1891), Hypnosis. Standard Edition, 1:103-114. London: Hogarth Press, 1966.

— (1895), Project for a scientific psychology. Standard Edition, 1:283-397. London: Hogarth Press, 1966.

— (1904), Freud’s psycho-analytic procedure. Standard Edition, 7:249-256. London: Hogarth Press, 1953.

— (1905), Physical (or mental) treatment. Standard Edition, 7:283-304. London: Hogarth Press, 1953.

— (1917), Introductory Lectures on Psycho-Analysis. Part M. Standard Edition, 16:243-463. London: Hogarth Press, 1963.

— (1921), Group psychology and the analysis of the ego. Standard Edition, 18:67-143. London: Hogarth Press, 1955.

— (1925), An autobiographical study. Standard Edition, 20:7-70. London; Hogarth Press, 1959.

Fromm, E. (1972), Ego activity and ego passivity in hypnosis. Internat. J. Clin. Exp.. Hypn., 20:239-251.

Gill, M. M. & Brenman, M. (1961), Hypnosis and Related States. New York: IUP.

Gray, P. (1990) The nature of therapeutic action in psychoanalysis. J. Amer. Psychoanal. Assn., 38:1083-1097.

Grof, S. (1975) Realms of the Human Unsconscious. London: Souvenir Press (E&A).

— (1985), Beyond the Brain. Albany: State University of New York Press.

— (1988) The Adventure of Self-Discovery. Albany: State University of New York Press.

— with Bennett, H. Z. (1992), The Holotropic Mind. San Francisco: Harper.

Hilgard, E. R. (1965), Hypnotic Susceptibility New York: Harcourt, Brace & World.

Hofmann, A (1983) LSD My Problem Child, trans. J. Ou. Los Angeles: Tracher.

Mack, J. E. (1990) Changing Models of Psychotherapy: From Psychological Conflict to Human Empowerment, Center for Psychology & Social Change, Cambridge, MA.

— (1992), Power: An Overview. Presented at symposium of the Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute. “Power: Empowerment and Abuse in Clinical Practice and Everyday Life,” March 14 & 15, 1992.

— (1994), Power, Powerlessness and Empowerment in Psychotherapy. Psychiatry, 57:178-198.

Speigel, D. (1981), Vietnam grief work using hypnosis. Amer. J. Clin. Hypn., 24:33-40.

Speigel, H. & Speigel, D. (1978), Trance and Treatment. New York: Basic Books.

  • John E. Mack, M.D. was a Pulitzer Prize-winning author and professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School.

© 1993 John E. Mack, M.D.
Chapter 16 excerpted from Ablon, Steven; Brown, Daniel; Khantzian, Edward J., and Mack, John E. (Eds.), Human Feelings: Explorations in Affect Development and Meaning. New Jersey: The Analytic Press, 1993. pp. 357-371.




Estados Não-ordinários de Consciência e o Acesso a Sentimentos

John E. Mack, M.D.

Portuguese Translation by Helena Rabaça Küller

Temos vindo ultimamente a assistir a uma expansão do interesse em psicoterapias, workshops promotoras do desenvolvimento humano e métodos de exploração interna focados na espiritualidade que têm em comum a utilização de estados não-ordinários de consciência para aceder a experiências e emoções mais profundas e intensas. À primeira vista estas abordagens podem parecer novas, desviantes, ou até radicais. Na realidade, porém, elas representam meios de redescobrir o acesso a reinos da psique conhecidos dos povos antigos e sociedades não-ocidentais desde o início dos tempos. Curas xamânicas, misticismo, yoga kundalini, plantas alucinogénicas, métodos de meditação e experiências religiosas extáticas, são apenas alguns dos modos através dos quais os seres humanos se têm aberto às regiões mais profundas da psique ao longo da história.

O racionalismo descomedido da mente Ocidental tem sido bem sucedido em nos separar deste conhecimento mais completo de nós mesmos e do universo no qual estamos inseridos. O trabalho de Freud poderá, sob este aspecto, ser considerado como um esforço inicial para voltar a familiarizar a nossa cultura com estes esquecidos domínios do conhecimento. Contudo, ao concentrar-se quase exclusivamente no desenvolvimento biográfico e na experiência individual, Freud ignorou as extraordinárias implicações daquilo que estava a descobrir, deixando a outros a tarefa de cartografar de um modo mais completo os tesouros virtualmente infinitos da psique humana.

FREUD E O USO HISTÓRICO DA HIPNOSE

A Psicanálise teve as suas origens na utilização, por Freud (1925), do estado não-ordinário de consciência mais familiar à medicina Ocidental, a hipnose, para explorar as origens inconscientes de sintomas neuróticos (p. 19). Freud expandiu o uso da hipnose, da sua limitada utilização por Liebault e Bernheim como método de remover sintomas através de sugestão, para o seu uso mais alargado enquanto método de investigação. É espantoso estas palavras estarem a ser escritas há quase exactamente um século depois de Freud ter desistido do uso da hipnose para fins terapêuticos a favor do método de concentração e, posteriormente, da associação livre, o que levou ao desenvolvimento da Psicanálise em si. Embora tenha abandonado a hipnose devido a razões complexas, incluindo o facto de que não se considerava competente nela, Freud reconheceu ao longo de toda a vida a sua dívida à hipnose por esta lhe ter aberto a paisagem do inconsciente humano. “Nós, os psicanalistas, podemos reivindicar ser seus legítimos herdeiros e não esquecemos o quanto encorajamento e clarificação teórica lhe devemos” (Freud, 1917, p. 462), escreveu Freud 25 anos após ter cessado a utilização de hipnose nos seus pacientes.

Reconsiderar as principais razões que levaram Freud a desistir da hipnose poderá ajudar-nos a compreender porque é que um século mais tarde terapeutas e pacientes estão a retornar à utilização de estados não-ordinários de consciência, incluindo a hipnose, para tratar diversas desordens emocionais e para explorar de modo mais aprofundado as forças psicológicas inconscientes. Ao considerarmos como a hipnose era usada no tempo de Freud (ou seja, sugerir o desaparecimento de sintomas através do uso da autoridade do médico enquanto o paciente estava num estado não-ordinário de consciência), não é de surpreender que muitos pacientes “tivessem uma recaída” e que o método aparentasse ser ineficaz do ponto de vista terapêutico.

Na perspectiva emergente de Freud do processo terapêutico na Psicanálise a figura ou o papel do médico era de importância fundamental. As mudanças terapêuticas viriam a ser encaradas como resultado de muitos factores mas o de maior importância era a análise da transferência – os significados e as atribuições distorcidas do passado do paciente projectados para a pessoa do analista. A ligação hipnótica, na perspectiva de Freud, era uma relação muitíssimo erotizada cuja eficácia dependia da autoridade do médico e dificilmente permitia uma avaliação detalhada dos sentimentos e pensamentos do paciente orientados para o médico, do qual o tratamento psicanalítico se tornou cada vez mais mais dependente.

Quando Freud ainda utilizava a hipnose para fins terapêuticos, as suas anotações sobre como trabalhava indicam o modo peremptório e totalmente não analítico como falava com os pacientes: “O senhor não está a dormir, mas está hipnotizado, está sob a minha influência; o que lhe irei dizer de seguida irá fazer em si uma impressão especial e ser-lhe-á muito útil.” (Freud, 1891, p. 110). Mais de uma década após ter deixado de utilizar a hipnose e de ter desenvolvido o método de livre associação de ideias, Freud (1905) ainda encarava a hipnose sob esta perspectiva autoritária.

O hipnotizador diz: “O senhor vê uma cobra; está a cheirar uma rosa; está a ouvir uma música lindíssima”, e o hipnotizado vê, cheira e ouve o que lhe foi exigido pela ideia que lhe foi transmitida… fora da hipnose, e na vida real, uma credulidade como a que o sujeito tem para com o seu hipnotizador só é demonstrada por uma criança em relação aos seus pais amados… uma atitude de submissão semelhante da parte de um indivíduo em relação a outro só tem um paralelo, embora total – nomeadamente em certas relações amorosas onde existe uma devoção extrema [p. 296].

A ideia de que, na prática, a hipnose exigia uma atitude de escravo por parte do paciente em relação ao hipnotizador poderá ter sido consequência de convicções do século XIX, dos tempos de Mesmer, Puysegar, Braid, Charcot e outros. Era sem dúvida incompatível com a ênfase na análise da resistência que se tornou central no método terapêutico de Freud. “A objecção à hipnose”, escreveu Freud num trabalho de 1904 sobre procedimentos psicanalíticos, “é que ela esconde a resistência e, por essa razão, obstrui a compreensão do médico sobre a acção das forças psíquicas. A hipnose não faz desaparecer a resistência mas apenas a evita e, como tal, produz apenas informação incompleta e um sucesso terapêutico transitório” [p. 252].

O repúdio por parte de Freud da hipnose como técnica terapêutica baseia-se na ideia de que a natureza do processo hipnótico implica contornar o “eu” observador do paciente e a submissão ao hipnotizador do funcionamento executivo do ego. A convicção de que o paciente tem que ser um agente mais ou menos passivo, submetendo a sua vontade à autoridade do hipnotizador, ao qual está emocionalmente ligado ao estilo de Svengali, tem, creio eu, prejudicado a visão profissional da hipnose e possivelmente também a nossa atitude em relação ao uso terapêutico de outros estados não-ordinários de consciência.

Apesar das conotações negativas, terá sido talvez inevitável o renascer do interesse no uso de estados não-ordinários de consciência em geral, e da hipnose em particular, para a exploração dos recônditos da psique e para o tratamento de perturbações emocionais. Isto porque, com as descobertas da Psicanálise, juntamente com o desenvolvimento neste século do interesse pela riqueza e complexidade da vida emocional do ser humano, ficámos também a conhecer as limitações dos métodos puramente verbais para a investigação do conteúdo e dos processos mentais do inconsciente. Os estados de transe hipnótico facilitam (quase que por definição) a suspensão da atenção aos estímulos da consciência normal do estado de vigília e permitem que os intrincadamente estratificados domínios afectivo e cognitivo do mundo interior se manifestem.

Gill e Brenman (Brenman e Gill, 1947; Gill e Brenman, 1961), Hilgard (1965), Frankel (1976), Spiegel e Spiegel (1978), Brown e Fromm (1986), e Fass e Brown (1990) estabeleceram o extraordinário valor da hipnose como ferramenta de investigação, não só na exploração da percepção, do transe, de estados dissociativos e do funcionamento do ego nos seres humanos, como também no tratamento de diversas condições clínicas. As aplicações terapêuticas contemporâneas da hipnose são bem mais sofisticadas do que os métodos aplicados no tempo de Freud. Desenvolvidas a partir de técnicas de Milton Erickson, Erika Fromm e outros, as abordagens actualmente utilizadas são largamente “permissivas” em vez de autoritárias, permitindo que as energias criativas e as instruções do próprio paciente guiem o processo, tendo o hipnotizador essencialmente o papel de facilitador proporcionando um contexto seguro e estruturado no qual o trabalho se possa realizar (Fass e Brown, 1990, p. 46).

Aceder, tolerar, expressar e integrar experiências de forte impacto emocional têm uma importância fundamental no uso terapêutico da hipnose, dado que as vicissitudes do desenvolvimento humano têm incluído para inúmeros indivíduos uma vasto leque de encontros, estímulos, entusiasmos, desilusões e desgostos cujas energias patogénicas persistem até a sua origem poder ser identificada e as memórias com carga emocional serem recuperadas e processadas de novo. A hipnose é possivelmente o estado não-ordinário de consciência classicamente estruturado, dado que inclui técnicas verbais e não verbais para facilitar e organizar a emergência de memórias com carga emocional e para controlar a intensidade regressiva dos processos de investigação e terapêuticos.

Fromm (1972), Spiegel (1981), e Haley (este volume, 1993) demonstraram como a hipnose pode ser utilizada para desenvolver no paciente a sensação de ser responsável pela mente, ou ter o controlo desta, e pelo processo terapêutico em si, à medida que emergem memórias afectivas perturbadoras. Este realce na sensação do paciente de ser agente e de ter plenos poderes, é consistente com as modificações nas noções contemporâneas de transferência e na relação terapeuta-paciente. O trabalho terapêutico está, no geral, a ser cada vez mais percepcionado em termos não hierárquicos, com o analista/terapeuta a funcionar como um facilitador num processo de colaboração ou de diálogo. Atribuições por transferência surgem naturalmente, mas nas abordagens contemporâneas mútuas ou de colaboração as distorções na percepção da figura do analista – cujo exame outrora constituía a espinha dorsal do tratamento – têm menos possibilidade de ser encorajadas. A figura do médico ou do terapeuta, incluindo o hipnotizador, está a tornar-se menos central, à medida que se dá cada vez mais autoridade à autodescoberta e ao autofuncionamento do próprio paciente (Gray, 1990).

Esta mudança na nossa perspectiva da natureza do trabalho terapêutico (Mack, 1990, 1992) tem grandes implicações para a utilização de estados não-ordinários de consciência no trabalho clínico. Por exemplo, no método de respiração holotrópica de Grof, o qual irá ser abordado mais tarde, o papel do líder é o de um facilitador, os elementos de transferência são reduzidos ao mínimo, e é depositada grande confiança na sabedoria interior do paciente durante o processo de autodescoberta (Grof, 1988, 1992).

TRAUMA, AFECTO E ESTADOS NÃO-ORDINÁRIOS DE CONSCIÊNCIA

O reconhecimento e a compreensão do trauma têm sido fundamentais na evolução da teoria e prática psicanalíticas e psicodinâmicas. As primeiras utilizações da hipnose por parte de Charcot, Lebeault, Bernheim e Freud levaram ao reconhecimento de que experiências que derivam de alguma acção ou acontecimento no mundo exterior e que sobrecarregam as defesas do ego, produzem um estado de tensão insuportável e impossível de gerir que não pode ser aliviado senão através da manifestação de sintomas, de desenvolvimentos de carácter patológico, de acções destrutivas (incluindo autodestrutivas), ou da fragmentação do ego. Central a todas as teorias sobre trauma há um estado fundamental de abandono e de vulnerabilidade e uma incapacidade de definir, viver, expressar ou integrar os afectos perturbadores causados por esses acontecimentos dolorosos ou intimidativos. Por conseguinte, o trauma é o resultado de uma relação entre os mundos intra-psíquico e exterior.

Face à intensidade com a qual o ego se esforça por evitar o desconforto associado a memórias traumáticas, não é de surpreender que o uso de uma ferramenta terapêutica poderosa como a hipnose, a qual pode transpor barreiras de defesa, levasse à recuperação de memórias traumáticas. Quando Freud desistiu da hipnose e desenvolveu o método psicanalítico, ele voltou-se também para a exploração do mundo intra-psíquico e, em certa medida, abandonou o estudo do trauma, especialmente dos efeitos patológicos de sedução sexual incestuosa nas jovens que estava a tratar.

De modo gradual e inevitável, os clínicos de saúde mental regressaram ao estudo e ao tratamento do trauma emocional, por mais que não seja porque os efeitos dolorosos e profundos de abuso sexual e maus-tratos, guerra e ameaça de guerra, problemas de refugiados, injustiças raciais, desigualdades e privações económicas, desmembramento e instabilidade familiares e separações de todos os géneros, nos forçaram a remodelar as nossa formulações teóricas e a reordenar as nossa prioridades clínicas.

Vários capítulos deste livro abordam a relação entre trauma agudo e crónico e distúrbios afectivos, e a renovada atenção dada ao trauma está a permitir-nos não só descobrir as complexas forças biológicas, psicológicas e sociais nele envolvidas como também novas abordagens para o tratamento, ao mesmo tempo que se retorna a – e se redescobrem – métodos mais antigos que tinham sido abandonados no desenvolvimento da Psicanálise.

É neste contexto – o retorno da nossa atenção ao trauma – que o interesse renovado no poder terapêutico de estados não-ordinários de consciência pode ser entendido. Pois é através da utilização de tais estados de consciência que os clínicos são capazes de abordar de modo mais eficaz memórias reprimidas e sentimentos a elas associados, os quais na altura em que o trauma estava a ocorrer não podiam ser reconhecidos, sentidos, ou expressos. Por exemplo, Hayley (este volume) descreve a utilização da hipnose para aceder a emoções e memórias de acções de combate de veteranos do Vietname extremamente perturbadoras, as quais esmagaram as defesas emocionais dos soldados e violaram de um modo tão profundo valores pessoais basilares no momento em que ocorreram, que a própria capacidade de sentir – o que, acima de tudo, nos torna humanos – ficou seriamente danificada. A hipnose é aqui utilizada para identificar, revelar, e processar memórias traumáticas e os fortes distúrbios afectivos associados, inacessíveis na altura em que o evento traumático ocorreu (Brown e Fromm, 1986). Em contraste com a utilização inicial da hipnose, essencialmente para eliminar a repressão e para remoção de sintomas através da sugestão, as utilizações contemporâneas para tratamento do trauma englobam um processo de tratamento sistémico, no qual a hipnose é utilizada conjuntamente com outros métodos terapêuticos tais como a relaxação auto-hipnótica, visualizações guiadas e técnicas hipnoprojectivas, bem como várias abordagens para apoio e adaptação do ego (Brown e Fromm, 1986, p. 277). Nestas abordagens, os objectivos terapêuticos incluem não só descobrir e processar afectos perturbadores, mas também a integração do ego, o auto-desenvolvimento, e até o “controlo psico-fisiológico adquirido” de modo a permitir que o indivíduo traumatizado reaja de uma maneira menos sensível a um futuro despoletar de experiências traumáticas (Brown e Fromm, 1986; van der Kolk, este volume).

A RESPIRAÇÃO HOLOTRÓPICA DE GROF

O uso terapêutico de um estado não-ordinário de consciência é fulcral no método de respiração holotrópica desenvolvido por Stanislav e Christina Grof (Grof, 1988, 1992). Stanislav é um médico formado em Praga nos anos 50 como psicanalista da escola de Freud. Em 1956, tornou-se um dos primeiros médicos a fazer experiências com LSD pouco depois de este ter sido descoberto por Albert Hofmann nos Laboratórios Sandoz na Suíça (Hofmann, 1983). As experiências pessoais de Grof com este agente alucinogénico modificaram de modo radical a sua visão da psique humana, do processo terapêutico e da sua compreensão sobre o lugar da espécie humana no cosmos. Ele descobriu que existiam vastos (“transpessoais”) reinos do inconsciente para além do que ele tinha observado ser acessível pelo método de associação livre. Emoções intensas e imagens poderosas associadas a experiências na infância, o seu próprio nascimento e domínios fora da história biográfica, abriram-se à consciência através do uso de LSD (Grof, 1975).

Durante as duas décadas seguintes, Grof realizou cerca de 4 mil sessões de investigação e de terapia com LSD na Checoslováquia e nos Estados Unidos. Na década de 70, descobriu que sessões em que era utilizada respiração profunda e acelerada, com música evocativa, e realizadas num ambiente seguro e de apoio podiam dar acesso aos mesmos reinos de experiência pessoal e transcendental com que ele se deparava usando LSD. Nos últimos 15 anos o casal Grof realizou milhares de sessões de respiração holotrópica, em pequenos grupos e em workshops, e tem treinado várias centenas de profissionais neste método que estão hoje a aplicá-lo nos Estados Unidos e na Europa.

A minha primeira experiência directa com a respiração holotrópica ocorreu em 1987 com o casal Grof, num pequeno grupo, no Instituto Esalen na Califórnia. Durante a sessão de duas horas, tive sentimentos muito fortes de perda associados à morte da minha mãe biológica quando eu tinha 8 anos e meio de idade, bem como um sentido profundo, naquele momento e em sessões subsequentes, tanto do sofrimento dela com a peritonite antes de falecer como com a dor do meu pai após a sua morte – emoções sobre as quais eu tinha falado bastante durante as minhas duas análises mas a que nunca tinha sido capaz de aceder de modo tão imediato. Durante essa sessão, na qual também participavam dois soviéticos, tive a minha própria introdução aos reinos transpessoais do inconsciente, nomeadamente uma fortíssima experiência de identificação com uma pessoa, outro ser, objecto da natureza, ou força, existente fora da minha história pessoal. Eu “tornei-me” num pai russo (no que parecia ser o séc. XV) que não fora capaz de proteger o filho de 4 anos de ser decapitado pelos mongóis. Devido a esta experiência, a minha capacidade de identificação com os receios soviéticos e a aparentemente irrealista política de defesa desenvolveu-se consideravelmente, o que me permitiu ser mais eficaz no trabalho psico-político da relação sovieto-americana no qual na altura eu estava envolvido. As minhas sessões subsequentes disseram respeito a experiências biográficas, relacionadas com o nascimento, e transpessoais, igualmente poderosas e valiosas.

Com base na sua experiência com LSD e com respiração holotrópica, Grof desenvolveu uma nova topografia, ou “cartografia” da psique humana: memórias e sentimentos relacionados com níveis de experiência peri-natais, pós-natais e transpessoais misturam-se de modo complexo e podem ser acedidos através de estados não-ordinários de consciência incluindo, além da respiração holotrópica e de substâncias alucinogénicas, a hipnose, experiências místicas, estados profundos de meditação, yoga, viagens xamânicas e êxtases religiosos. Memórias biográficas e sentimentos reprimidos regressam com especial força e nitidez. As experiências relacionadas com o nascimento, cuja origem pode ser traçada às etapas do processo de nascimento em si (Grof identificou quatro fases do nascimento denominadas matrizes) são revividas com grande intensidade (Grof, 1985). As experiências de nascimento, morte e renascimento abrem a consciência do indivíduo a reinos de experiência para além do material consciente e inconsciente que é familiar. Por último, o indivíduo é capaz de descobrir afinidades fora das relações interpessoais até então conhecidas ao ter encontros de profundo impacto ou ao identificar-se com figuras mitológicas e, potencialmente, com todos os elementos do cosmos, humanos e não humanos. O inconsciente colectivo, o qual muitas vezes é largamente uma construção teórica nas teorias de Jung, torna-se numa realidade viva nas experiências de respiração holotrópica.

A dimensão transpessoal do trabalho tem um impacto espiritual profundo, ao religar o indivíduo a experiências religiosas primárias, a um sentido de reverência sagrada, com o qual poderá ter deixado de ter contacto desde a infância. “Aberturas do coração” poderosas, experiências inspiradoras, luminosas ou transcendentais, levam o indivíduo a um sentido mais elevado de valor e de propósito, e de ligação com o universo. A natureza em si torna-se imbuída (ou novamente imbuída) de uma profunda e inefável beleza sagrada e de maravilha, tornando-se intolerável a destruição levada a cabo pela tecnologia e pelos desejos materiais. Provavelmente, a diferença mais fundamental entre o método de respiração holotrópica e a Psicanálise – ou as psicoterapias derivadas da Psicanálise – está no papel do terapeuta. Nas terapias psicodinâmicas, pelo menos como são tradicionalmente praticadas, o papel do clínico é fulcral, seja como figura de transferência ou ao fornecer, através da sua própria pessoa ou interpretação, uma espécie de experiência correctiva ou um novo modelo de relacionamento. Na respiração holotrópica, fortes sentimentos em relação à figura do líder/facilitador ou a outras figuras de apoio ocorrem naturalmente e tal figura poderá até ser distorcida, idealizada ou desvalorizada. Mas o processo fundamental não se baseia primariamente na transferência ou até na relação que se tem com o clínico. Em vez disso, uma espécie de radar interior escrutina o inconsciente num processo de abertura e de descoberta, facilitado ou possibilitado pelo terapeuta/líder, mas não focado nele.

Como é realizada em sessões individuais ou em grupos, é criado um espaço seguro que proporciona espaço suficiente para o(s) indivíduo(s) se mover(em) livremente em resposta a impulsos corporais ou a sentimentos intensos que surgem durante a sessão. Cada indivíduo é colocado com um “acompanhante”, o qual trata das necessidades básicas e da segurança do indivíduo, tais como dar água, lenços de papel e protecção ao impedir que o indivíduo vá contra alguém ou que alguém vá contra ele, ou acompanhar o indivíduo à casa-de-banho. O líder é auxiliado por outros facilitadores, um dos quais está encarregue da música. Uma proporção de um facilitador para quatro ou seis pares parece ser ideal. As sessões começam numa sala um tanto obscurecida, com os indivíduos que praticam a respiração deitados de costas, numa posição confortável, aberta, às vezes cobertos com um cobertor ou usando palas para bloquear a luz. São instruídos para porem de parte expectativas e para não tentarem solucionar qualquer problema identificado ou concentrarem a sua atenção num conflito particular ou “assunto”, mas terem confiança de que a sua própria sabedoria interior vai levar a sua consciência onde esta necessita de ir. Um leve exercício de relaxamento inicia o processo de se virar para o interior de si mesmo, e é dada a instrução de respirar de um modo mais profundo e rápido, após o que a música se inicia – alta e enérgica de início, depois mais constante, comovente ou celestial, variando de acordo com as escolhas do facilitador.

À medida que o processo de se virar para o interior de si mesmo se aprofunda, e a actividade da mente agitada que normalmente associamos com o consciente do quotidiano vai cessando ou é notada sem a ela se reagir (como também ocorre na meditação), surgem no consciente fortes emoções, sensações físicas, impulsos, e imagens poderosas, as quais podem estar relacionadas com experiências biográficas ou peri-natais ou com reinos transpessoais pouco a ver com a história conhecida do indivíduo. É difícil generalizar, mas de um ponto de vista ontológico a qualidade da experiência tende, no seu auge, a estar algures entre o fantasiar e o estar plenamente presente numa nova realidade. O indivíduo poderá, por exemplo, estar completamente envolvido numa luta com um deus ou outro ser mitológico ou tornar-se por completo num peixe a nadar debaixo de água. Simultaneamente, contudo, um pequeno mas constante ego observador está a registar o que está a ser vivido e, normalmente, pode relatar sobre isso mais tarde.

De um ponto de vista afectivo, a intensidade e a diversidade de sentimentos são superiores aos que geralmente observo em terapias que não utilizam um estado não-ordinário de consciência. Isto é especialmente verdade quando repositórios de sentimentos recalcados são identificados e trazidos à consciência e à sua manifestação plena através de técnicas de bodywork eficientes (Grof e Bennett, 1992, p.16). As sessões geralmente têm uma duração de duas a três horas e são concluídas pelo criar de uma mandala, a qual poderá expressar elementos fundamentais da experiência, mesmo até quando o indivíduo se considera inepto como artista.

O líder funciona como um facilitador para que o valor da experiência se possa manifestar, vigiando o espaço físico, assegurando-se da segurança elementar de todos os indivíduos, observando se a música está a fazer circular a energia na sala numa direcção positiva (uma avaliação que é largamente intuitiva) e efectuar, sempre que necessário, bodywork focado (Grof e Bennett, 1992, p.16). Mais uma vez, elementos de transferência podem surgir: o facilitador poderá parecer ao indivíduo um progenitor terno ou intimidante, ou ser confundido com um deus, deusa, ou outro ser mitológico. Mas esta dimensão é secundária. O trabalho terapêutico, curativo ou promotor de desenvolvimento é largamente o resultado da orientação da própria psique, o radar interior (Grof e Bennett, 1992, p.16) que identifica aquilo a que o nosso consciente necessita de aceder. Desta forma, construções teóricas ou ideias preconcebidas sobre “aquilo em que tenho hoje que trabalhar” são postas de parte em favor de um conhecimento inconsciente dos reinos interiores que necessitam de ser explorados nessa altura. É extraordinário que em posterior discussão, ou ao compartilhar a experiência em pequenos grupos, a relevância do que ocorreu durante a sessão para a vida corrente do indivíduo se torna aparente – às vezes com uma clareza surpreendente.

RESPIRAÇÃO HOLOTRÓPICA, TRAUMA E AFECTO

O método de respiração holotrópica pode suscitar uma vasta gama de emoções profundas e levar o indivíduo ao contacto com um mundo rico em imagens e sensações, quer o indivíduo escolha ter a experiência por razões terapêuticas ou para desenvolvimento pessoal. A técnica de respiração sublinha, contudo, o importante papel patogénico do trauma no desenvolvimento humano. O trauma, como refere Herman (este volume) pode variar desde uma única e grave agressão a sofrimento complexo, crónico e catastrófico tanto físico como psicológico. Grof faz distinção entre traumas por comissão, tais como crueldade por parte dos pais, operações cirúrgicas ocorridas na infância, violação, vários tipos de maus-tratos e de abuso sexual, experiências de guerra e enquanto refugiado ou o processo do nascimento em si, e os traumas por omissão, os quais estão associados com carência, perda ou necessidades emocionais por satisfazer. Em ambos os casos, o poder terapêutico está na capacidade do indivíduo, no estado alterado de consciência, em aceder a experiências passadas que na altura tinham ocorrido sob condições em que, com frequência, a experiência não pudera sequer ser definida e os sentimentos não puderam ser identificados, sentidos ou expressos.

A história traumática poderá ser muito bem conhecida do indivíduo. Na minha primeira sessão, outro indivíduo, um homem com 50 e tal anos, gritava com medo e raiva ao reviver uma tentativa da sua mãe para o estrangular quando ele era bebé. Nessa primeira sessão, contou-me ele meses mais tarde, sentiu, no estado não-ordinário de consciência associado a esta experiência, um maior alívio do medo e da raiva do que alguma vez tinha sentido ao falar sobre isso durante muitos anos noutras formas de terapia. Através deste método, muitos pacientes são capazes de descobrir operações cirúrgicas que tinham ocorrido na infância ou negligência relacional por parte dos pais. Podem obter alívio de sintomas incapacitantes ou afectos restritivos – emoções que têm estado reprimidas ou bloqueadas desde a altura do trauma.

As memórias de muitas formas de trauma, tais como operações cirúrgicas ocorridas na infância e acidentes, ou experiências agudas e crónicas de maus-tratos e de abuso sexual, são armazenadas no corpo e fechadas a sete chaves, ao que parece tanto nas células dos tecidos como no cérebro. O processo de aceder, ou voltar a aceder, a emoções num estado não-ordinário de consciência tal como ocorre no método de respiração holotrópica poderá estar relacionado com as emoções recuperadas através de emergência autónoma, como van der Kolk discute neste volume. Memórias que parecem ser inacessíveis através de técnicas de associação poderão ter sido inicialmente registadas como não expressas ou até como energias fisiologicamente ancoradas não detectadas, e poderão requerer um novo contexto e novos métodos para as aceder de modo a aliviar os sintomas e a integrar o impacto patológico incapacitante das experiências originais. À medida que as memórias traumáticas e os sentimentos intensos a elas associados são acedidos durante estados não-ordinários, poderão emergir energias intensas, expressas através de tensões no corpo, tremores, choro, vocalizações e outras expressões emocionais. Por vezes, tensões “fixam-se” na musculatura, requerendo bodywork focalizado e desempenhado por facilitadores qualificados, de modo a fazer circular a energia. Os facilitadores oferecem resistência ao esforço do indivíduo ao mesmo tempo que, paradoxalmente, este é encorajado a exagerar a tensão ou a força nos grupos de músculos envolvidos. A expressão de um som intenso, como um gemido ou um grito, ajuda também a libertar a emoção dolorosamente armazenada.

No caso de situações de privações pessoais ou de perda, o reviver de feridas íntimas num ambiente compreensivo e de protecção pode ser extremamente terapêutico. Um acompanhante sensível pode dar conforto e amparo, especialmente no final da sessão quando o indivíduo manifesta maior abertura e está mais necessitado. É importante que o acompanhante reconheça a vulnerabilidade e a abertura especiais provocadas pelo estado alterado de consciência na sessão de respiração para que não introduza a sua própria necessidade emocional de curar ou socorrer o indivíduo. Acima de tudo, a segurança proporcionada e a oportunidade para voltar a aceder e tolerar por meio do estado alterado de consciência a perda original e os dolorosos afectos associados, constituem o ponto central do processo terapêutico ou curativo.

A seguir à sessão de respiração holotrópica, na qual uma enorme quantidade de intensa carga emocional poderá ter emergido, é importante que seja dada oportunidade aos indivíduos de integrar a experiência que tiveram, partilhando-a numa discussão em pequenos grupos e em sessões individuais com clínicos familiarizados com o uso de estados não-ordinários de consciência para fins terapêuticos e com os reinos peri-natais e transpessoais do inconsciente. Este processo poderá ser semelhante ao “processar” que ocorre na Psicanálise tradicional excepto que aqui o trabalho terapêutico ou curativo básico ocorre no estado não-ordinário de consciência, enquanto que a verbalização serve para consolidar e integrar os sentimentos intensos e as descobertas pessoais que ocorreram durante as sessões de respiração. Psicoterapias mais tradicionais ou “tratamentos verbais” são especialmente importantes a seguir a sessões de respiração holotrópica, de modo a explorar as mudanças e decisões futuras no que respeita a relacionamentos e escolhas relacionadas com o trabalho. Após a exploração da psique através da respiração holotrópica, ou outros tipos de estados não-ordinários de consciência, há grande probabilidade de que ocorram profundas alterações na visão do mundo, nos valores e nas prioridades pessoais. Isto pode levar a que o indivíduo se sinta bastante só e “deslocado” a menos que tenha uma comunidade de amigos ou colegas que tenham também descoberto reinos holotrópicos no seu próprio trabalho terapêutico ou via espiritual.

ELEMENTOS EM COMUM E DIFERENÇAS

Há, é claro, uma enorme variedade de meios que conduzem a estados não-ordinários de consciência para além da hipnose, da respiração holotrópica (acima mencionada) e da meditação (Brown, este volume). A maior parte deles pode ser usada em terapia ou para desenvolvimento pessoal, e incluem viagens xamânicas, substâncias alucinogénicas, estados de êxtases religiosos, yoga, técnicas de relaxação, toque terapêutico, bodywork (por si só ou em combinação com métodos psicológicos), vários tipos de terapias energéticas e de massagem, bem como certos tipos de música, leitura de poesia e outras formas de experiência e expressão artística. A Psicanálise e a associação livre criam, até certo ponto, um estado não-ordinário de consciência, especialmente quando se trabalha intensivamente com os sonhos e afectos associados. Contudo, a dependência na verbalização, na dimensão interactiva ou na dimensão relacional em curso e o processo interpretativo, tendem a limitar até que ponto o método facilita a criação de um estado alterado ou é capaz de dar acesso aos reinos mais profundos do inconsciente.

Freud (1895) escreveu sobre o “desaparecimento da fixação da atenção” no mundo exterior que ocorre na hipnose (p. 337). Na sua opinião, a qual ele continuava a expressar em 1921 e que era consistente com a sua ênfase na centralidade da transferência, esta alteração nas “distribuições de energias mentais” ocorre como resultado do paciente dirigir a atenção para a pessoa do analista (Freud, 1921, p. 126). A perspectiva que aqui é oferecida para a hipnose e outros estados alterados, incluindo a meditação (“reduzindo a quantidade de input sensorial”, Brown, este volume), realça também a remoção da atenção do mundo exterior mas dá menos ênfase ao papel do líder ou terapeuta, o qual funciona mais como um guia, ou facilitador, de modo a apoiar o paciente ou cliente ao reorientar a atenção para o mundo interior.

Quando as energias do indivíduo estão efectivamente distanciadas do mundo exterior, e a atenção e a percepção se viram para os sentimentos, pensamentos e sensações interiores, um estado não-ordinário ocorre naturalmente. A profundidade deste estado depende da capacidade da pessoa para notar e, simultaneamente, “libertar” os produtos de actividade mental geradores de distracção há medida que estes passam pelo consciente. Esta atenção plena, ou mindfulness, ou o virar-se para o interior de si mesmo, é a característica comum de modalidades terapêuticas tais como a hipnose, a técnica respiratória de Grof e as técnicas e processos de meditação descritos por Brown (este volume). Estados não-ordinários terapêuticos têm também em comum a remoção de pensamentos e sentimentos dos níveis mais profundos da psique e a criação de uma nova percepção do inconsciente e do mundo interior. Como escreve Brown sobre o estado preliminar da meditação: “No meio do fluxo de pensamentos, memórias, fantasias, perceptos, sensações corporais e outros eventos na torrente do consciente, aquele que medita vai observar também o fluxo e refluxo de estados emocionais”.

Porém, a experiência de afectos por muito terapêutica que seja, ou fundamental à utilização de estados não-ordinários de consciência num contexto curativo, não é o objectivo dos estados avançados de meditação. Aí, o foco é a tomada de consciência em si e o processo de auto-observação. O “eu” em si, enquanto instrumento de conhecimento dissolve-se, e a experiência pura de interligação ou de unidade pode emergir. É permitido aos afectos, mesmo quando plenamente experienciados, manterem-se no consciente, mas apenas para que a percepção destes, tal como todas as outras percepções, possa existir sem a eles reagir. O objectivo final da meditação não é terapêutico, ou mesmo para conduzir à cura. É antes para trazer Iluminação, ao obter o controlo e modificar a própria estrutura do processamento de percepção e de informação de modo a que interesses egoístas possam ser renunciados e possa emergir a experiência de amor, compaixão, e de unidade. Por outras palavras, os estados não-ordinários, quando usados para fins terapêuticos, procuram trazer os reinos mais profundos da psique ao consciente de modo a expandir o auto-conhecimento e a integrar memórias e experiências das quais tínhamos sido separados ou que nos atormentam através das suas acções fora do nosso campo de percepção. Uma pessoa hábil em meditação, por outro lado, como escreve Brown (este volume), transforma a sua visão da realidade em si, ganhando acesso à consciência expandida ao decifrar “o código da estrutura tempo-espaço da percepção normal”.

SÍNTESE

Através de estados não-ordinários de consciência, podemos ser levados ao contacto com os ciclos de nascimento, morte e renascimento; com sentimentos intensos provenientes da tenra infância; e com reinos transpessoais nos quais cada indivíduo pode descobrir a capacidade de se identificar com seres e forças da natureza fora da experiência biográfica pessoal – uma reificação física e emocional da ideia do inconsciente colectivo de Jung.

Quando somos capazes de aceder, ou voltar a aceder, a emoções que tinham sido armazenadas nas células do corpo ou em sistemas reguladores autónomos, os poderes curativos do organismo humano, até aí bloqueados, podem ficar disponíveis. É neste processamento, ou processo de integração, que poderá residir o mais elevado valor terapêutico dos estados não-ordinários de consciência.

Por último, os estados não-ordinários de consciência têm valor para além das suas aplicações terapêuticas: são valiosos para o desenvolvimento pessoal e para a expansão do consciente. Como Brown descreve no Capítulo XVII, o virar da atenção de estímulos exteriores para os processos internos de pensar e de sentir, tal como ocorre em indivíduos experientes em meditação, permite questionar a estrutura da própria percepção e torna disponível informação proveniente de um reino do ser no qual as distinções entre o interior e o exterior ou entre a psique e a natureza perdem o poder e no qual pode ocorrer uma profundamente satisfatória expansão dos limites da consciência humana.

Referências Bibliográficas

Brenman, M. & Gill, M. M. (1947), Hypnotherapy: A Survey of the Literature. Menninger Foundation Monographs Series 5. New York: IUP.

Brown, D. & Fromm, E. (1986), Hypnotherapy and Hypnoanalysis. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Fass, M. & Brown, D., ed. (1990), Creative Mastery in Hypnosis and Hypnoanalysis. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Frankel, F. H. (1976), Hypnosis: Trance as a Coping Mechanism. New York: Plenum Medical Books.

Freud, S. (1891), Hypnosis. Standard Edition, 1:103-114. London: Hogarth Press, 1966.

— (1895), Project for a scientific psychology. Standard Edition, 1:283-397. London: Hogarth Press, 1966.

— (1904), Freud’s psycho-analytic procedure. Standard Edition, 7:249-256. London: Hogarth Press, 1953.

— (1905), Physical (or mental) treatment. Standard Edition, 7:283-304. London: Hogarth Press, 1953.

— (1917), Introductory Lectures on Psycho-Analysis. Part M. Standard Edition, 16:243-463. London: Hogarth Press, 1963.

— (1921), Group psychology and the analysis of the ego. Standard Edition, 18:67-143. London: Hogarth Press, 1955.

— (1925), An autobiographical study. Standard Edition, 20:7-70. London; Hogarth Press, 1959.

Fromm, E. (1972), Ego activity and ego passivity in hypnosis. Internat. J. Clin. Exp.. Hypn., 20:239-251.

Gill, M. M. & Brenman, M. (1961), Hypnosis and Related States. New York: IUP.

Gray, P. (1990) The nature of therapeutic action in psychoanalysis. J. Amer. Psychoanal. Assn., 38:1083-1097.

Grof, S. (1975) Realms of the Human Unsconscious. London: Souvenir Press (E&A).

— (1985), Beyond the Brain. Albany: State University of New York Press.

— (1988) The Adventure of Self-Discovery. Albany: State University of New York Press.

— with Bennett, H. Z. (1992), The Holotropic Mind. San Francisco: Harper.

Hilgard, E. R. (1965), Hypnotic Susceptibility New York: Harcourt, Brace & World.

Hofmann, A (1983) LSD My Problem Child, trans. J. Ou. Los Angeles: Tracher.

Mack, J. E. (1990) Changing Models of Psychotherapy: From Psychological Conflict to Human Empowerment, Center for Psychology & Social Change, Cambridge, MA.

— (1992), Power: An Overview. Presented at symposium of the Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute. “Power: Empowerment and Abuse in Clinical Practice and Everyday Life,” March 14 & 15, 1992.

— (1994), Power, Powerlessness and Empowerment in Psychotherapy. Psychiatry, 57:178-198.

Speigel, D. (1981), Vietnam grief work using hypnosis. Amer. J. Clin. Hypn., 24:33-40.

Speigel, H. & Speigel, D. (1978), Trance and Treatment. New York: Basic Books.

  • John E. Mack, M.D. foi um autor galardoado com o Prémio Pulitzer e professor de Psiquiatria na Harvard Medical School.

© 1993 John E. Mack, M.D.
Capítulo XVI retirado de: Ablon, Steven; Brown, Daniel; Khantzian, Edward J., and Mack, John E. (Eds.), Human Feelings: Explorations in Affect Development and Meaning. New Jersey: The Analytic Press, 1993. pp. 357-371.


  Subject Area: Psychiatric Arts

Comments are closed.