Political Worldviews


My Day in Manchester

by John E. Mack, M.D.

One week before his death, John Mack was in Manchester New Hampshire in advance of the US Presidential election. In this letter, originally composed to his sons, he shares his experience as a volunteer in “getting out the vote.”

Resisting the Politics of Fear

by John E. Mack, M.D.

“Because the terrorist danger is real, it is especially important that our capacity to assess the risk we face not be distorted for political gain.” Dr Mack’s final essay. Sept 2004.
ENGLISH · ITALIANO

The Responsible Warrior

by John E. Mack, M.D.

Dr Mack contrasts the leadership qualities of T.E. Lawrence (“Lawrence of Arabia”) with those of the American president George W Bush. A Boston Globe editorial, June 2004, written during Bush’s invasion of Iraq.

Deeper Causes: Exploring the Role of Consciousness in Terrorism

by John E. Mack, M.D.

“Without understanding what breeds these acts and drives the terrorists to do what they do … we have little chance of preventing further such actions, let alone of ‘eradicating terrorism.’” Harvard psychiatrist John Mack identifies three levels of causes: immediate, proximate, and deeper. Focusing on deeper causes, he shows how they are rooted in the nature of our minds, of consciousness itself. James O’Dea, president of IONS, notes “In this courageous and insightful article, Mack quotes former Governor Cuomo: ‘The only way to solve the terrorist problem is to change the minds of those who practice terrorism.’”

Clinical and Political Witnessing: A Meeting with a Palestinian Psychiatrist

by John E. Mack, M.D.

Some years ago as I began my clinical work with people who have experienced what many describe as “alien encounters,” I did not imagine that a central part of what I would learn would be how cultures lose opportunities to develop when the testimony of those whose experiences lie outside of what is generally endorsed is dismissed.

Trickster’s Time

by John E. Mack, M.D.

A New York Times editorial by Dr. John Mack published November 30 2000. The editorial considers the “tied” Presidential election of 2000 from the perspective of the trickster archetype.

Inventing a Psychology of Our Relationship to the Earth

John E. Mack, M.D.

How is psychology relevant to the serious environmental problems that we face today? John Mack proposes that we need to invent a new psychology of our relationship to the Earth, a psychology that would explore our feelings, impulses and desires in relation to the physical world, and how and why we have created institutions that are so destructive to it. This new psychology would need to be “comprehensive, holistic, and systemic,” enabling us to experience deeply our rootedness in and dependence on the earth.

Reflections on Two Kinds of Power

by John E. Mack, M.D.

The need for a sense of personal power is one of the primary motivating forces in human life. Conversely, the feeling of powerlessness or helplessness is perhaps the most disturbing of human emotions, one to be avoided at all costs. But what is power?
ENGLISH · ITALIANO

Can We End the Cold War? Should We?

by Robert S. McNamara

Mr. McNamara, one of the architects of the strategic policy that created the sea, land, and air nuclear triad in the 1960s, asks us to imagine a world no longer dominated by the threat of a face-off between East and West (US and USSR) and urges us to act on such a vision.
ENGLISH

The Enemy System (short version)

by John E. Mack, M.D.

The threat of nuclear annihilation has stimulated us to try to understand what it is about mankind that has led to such self-destroying behavior. Central to this inquiry is an exploration of the adversarial relationships between ethnic or national groups.
ENGLISH · ITALIANO

T. E. Lawrence’s Vision for the Middle East: How Does It Look Now?

by John E. Mack, M.D.

Lawrence (unlike the pro-Arab Gertrude Bell or the pro-Zionist Richard Meinertzhagen) was one of the few and one of the last people in his own time and ours to achieve true sympathy for both national movements. His references to both movements in Seven Pillars are positive. He actually believed that they could be reconciled, and, although subsequent events have seemed to prove him wrong at least to date, this belief only rebounds to his credit.

Corporate Leadership with a Global Perspective

by John E. Mack, M.D.

If, in our inescapable identification with the institutions in which we work, and the inevitable pressures we experience within them, we live in violation of privately held values and ideals, the result may be vague but profound discontent whose source may not be readily identifiable.

Taking Action: The Higher Law of the Nuclear Age

by John E. Mack, M.D.

I would assert that the decision to commit nonviolence civil disobedience is compatible with my political analysis and consistent with traditional academic values, if not a direct outgrowth of them.

Putting It On The Line In Nevada

By Cathy Cevoli

…Over 700 people from 35 states (and six countries) attended Saturday’s demonstration, and 149 were arrested on Monday, setting a test site civil disobedience record…

A Way to Halt the Arms Race

by John E. Mack, M.D.

A New York Times op/ed by Dr. John Mack recounting his family’s protest at a nuclear test site in Nevada during the height of the nuclear arms race.

Epilogue: Aggression and Its Alternatives in the Conduct of International Relations

by John E. Mack, M.D.

Long before the nuclear superpowers began to extend their competition into space Bertrand Russell (1959) wrote, “When I read of plans to defile the heavens…I cannot but feel that the men who make these plans are guilty of a kind of impiety”.
ENGLISH · ITALIANO

If We Ended the Arms Race

by Robert Coles and John Mack

A New York Times editorial in which the authors note that “habits of power are closely linked to a network of bureaucratic interests [that] form an institutional system that will be difficult to divert to nonmilitary purposes, even should we gain the will to do so.”
ENGLISH · ITALIANO

Cope Lecture on the Effects of Nuclear Proliferation

by John E. Mack, M.D.

A tour-de-force lecture by John E. Mack, who was invited to speak on the subject of the nuclear arms race, and physicians’ social responsibility. One of Dr. Mack’s most acclaimed presentations, and a precursor to the awarding in 1985 of the Nobel Peace Prize to Physicians for Social Responsibility (PSR, then directed by Dr. Mack) and International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War (IPPNW) “for spreading authoritative information and by creating an awareness of the catastrophic consequences of atomic warfare.”